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Sitting Bullís Circus Horse

There were many horses throughout history that made a great impact on the world that we live in today. Some have been highly profiled and talked about, while others have fallen to the wayside only to be discussed amongst major historian and equestrian enthusiasts.
The Dancing Circus Horse is one such horse that is often overlooked in the text books but had a great impact on the path of history. He was the side kick of Sitting Bull during his later years, a great holy man of the Lakota Sioux Tribe.

Sitting Bull

Sitting Bull’s career began as a warrior. His tribe was constantly being bombarded by the white men, and it was his job to lead his tribe in such battles. They fought for many years, before being eventually overrun by the onslaught of white men. Sitting Bull’s pride forced him to leave his tribe, in search of other things. He roamed around for a bit, before joining up with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show and Circus, where he performed as a figure head. He was often seen prancing around the ring in colorful garb, a top a beautiful white circus horse. He didn’t really have an act or skill, but the audience watched him with baited breathe each time he appeared in the ring.

Spotlight- Sitting Bulls’ Circus Horse

Some of the greatest horse stories begin with a war or fight, but the Circus Horse has a different timeline. He started from rather “showy” roots to prove himself a loyal companion till the very end. When Sitting Bull eventually left the Circus, he was given the Circus horse as a gift. He was well trained and behaved, and Sitting Bull was proud to accept him as his companion. The two returned back to the reservation, where Sitting Bull once again became a respected member of the community. Eventually, he became concerned with the white man’s involvement in the reservation and urged his people to stand up for what was rightfully theirs.

The government eventually stepped in and tried to arrest Sitting Bull for his treachery. He stood up against the law, and a battle ensued. Gun shots were fired, and many of the tribe, including Sitting Bull were eventually killed. When the Circus horse heard the gun shots, he immediately ran to Sitting Bull’s side- as he had done so many times before in the circus act. He then began to dance, where he shook his mane and pawed the ground for several hours. The battle continued around the dancing horse, bullets flying all around. The horse continued to dance throughout the battle and for hours after the commotion ended.

Loyal to the end

Sitting Bull’s tribe to this day tells the tale of the Circus Horse that danced in Sitting Bull’s honor. Many say that he was possessed with a spirit because he was untouched by the flying bullets, while others say that he was honoring his master as only he knew how.

 

 

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