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What Do You Bring To The Relationship With Your Horse?

The way you view the world and your place in it largely determines how you view and treat your horse. There are many levels of perception in our human experience and you have already traveled through some of them as a passenger on the train of life. Some levels of perception are very comfortable for you, others are enticing you into their attractor field, and others you diligently avoid. Your horse also views the world through his perspective, that of a prey animal without language and without the skill to alter his environment in times of danger.

See if you can find your current level of perception of your horse and your relationship with it on this Map of Consciousness developed by David Hawkins, M.D., Ph.D. in his ongoing research about the unseen determinants of human behavior. He calibrates levels of perception on a scale of enlightened awareness of what it means to be a sentient being, based on kinesiological methods he has perfected at his Center for Spiritual Research. Note that there is no right or wrong place to be on this map, it is simply a level of consciousness that you have reached on the road to enlightenment, a road we are all on whether or not we realize it. You may also find yourself on various levels of the map depending what emotion you are dealing with at any given time. For instance, you may be a very trusting person (250) and very forgiving (350), but you might be addicted to a substance such as nicotine (150). There is no right or wrong place to be although seeking a higher level is the optimal goal. The higher the (exponential) level, the more evolved the soul. It is helpful to read this map from the bottom up, finding your various aspects along the way up to the top.

MAP OF CONSCIOUSNESS

God-view

Life-view

Level

Log

Emotion

Process

Self

Is

Enlightenment

700-1000

Ineffable

Pure consciousness

All-being

Perfect

Peace

600

Bliss

Illumination

One

Complete

Joy

540

Serenity

Transfiguration

Loving

Benign

Love

500

Reverence

Revelation

Wise

Meaningful

Reason

400

Understanding

Abstraction

Merciful

Harmonious

Acceptance

350

Forgiveness

Transcendence

Inspiring

Hopeful

Willingness

310

Optimism

Intention

Enabling

Satisfactory

Neutrality

250

Trust

Release

Permitting

Feasible

Courage

200

Affirmation

Empowerment

Indifferent

Demanding

Pride

175

Scorn

Inflation

Vengeful

Antagonistic

Anger

150

Hate

Aggression

Denying

Disappointing

Desire

125

Craving

Enslavement

Punitive

Frightening

Fear

100

Anxiety

Withdrawal

Disdainful

Tragic

Grief

75

Regret

Despondency

Condemning

Hopeless

Apathy

50

Despair

Abdication

Vindictive

Evil

Guilt

30

Blame

Destruction

Despising

Miserable

Shame

20

Humiliation

Suicide

Note: Taken from Power vs. Force, David R. Hawkins, M.D., Ph.D., Hay House Inc., 2002.

Using this logarithmic map as a guide, let's go on a narrative journey about how a human at each level of consciousness might perceive a nervous, spooky and anxious horse being handled by a well-meaning but incapable human. The

Level, Descriptor, Viewpoint of observer

20, shame, the horse is seen as a lesser, dirty and stupid creature.

30, guilt, the horse deserves this attention from the human because of its bad behavior.

50, hopelessness, nothing can be done to help this horse in any case.

100, fear, the horse threatens humans and should be put down.

125, desire, why doesn't someone do something about this horse?

150, anger, why are horses abused to this point of bad behavior (or I would be angry at it, too).

175, pride, this horse is embarrassing his owner and his species.

200, courage, there must be a better place for this horse to live and train.

250, neutrality, the horse is having a bad day but the human is trying his best.

310, willingness, I think I might offer my help so the two of us can calm the horse.

350, acceptance, we may never know what happened to make the horse act this way.

400, reason, the horse might make a good experiment in some special training class.

410 to 599, peace, the horse struggles for happiness, which he deserves.

600, enlightenment, this horse is connected to all of us in its struggle.

Now reflect on what you bring to your relationship with your horse each time you interact with it as a rider, trainer, caretaker and fellow sentient being. The implications are wonderful and challenging. Since 85 percent of the world's population checks in at a log below 200, the entire subject of ignorant behavior toward the horse becomes easier to understand (but not easier to accept). Add to this the fact that the horse is an energy being that relates to you on the basis of what he senses and feels coming from you energetically. Then you can see how humans - even with the best intentions - can fail to communicate effectively with horses.

 

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